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Traps that once snares Uganda’s Wildlife are turned into art

A non-profit is helping local artisans make a living through selling sculptures made from the wiring in poacher’s traps in Murchison Falls National Park in Uganda.

A non-profit is helping local artisans make a living through selling sculptures made from the wiring in poacher’s traps in Murchison Falls National Park in Uganda.

The nation’s largest national park is a poaching hotspot, with the most common method being a wire snare that closes around an animal’s foot.

Most poaching is done for meat, as the communities surrounding the park are some of the poorest in the country, and most of the animals poached are smaller herbivores. Snares to Wares aids local people in developing their artists’ eye and crafters’ hand to weave hundreds of locally captured snares into intricate wire sculptures of the park’s wildlife.

The initiative was started by Tutilo Mudumbu, a National Geographic Explorer, and Robert Montgomery, a wildlife ecologist at Michigan State University, and now has 620 artisans onboard who sell on average about 800 sculptures a month.

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